Two amateur cooks explore the world of cooking for a Crohn's and Colitis diet

Archive for June, 2012

IBD Guide To Eating Out: Part II


We are proud to present Part II of our IBD restaurant guide series!  (To view Part I, click here!)  The average American eats out several times a week, and those with IBD often have a more difficult time choosing IBD-safe foods at restaurants or even finding a restaurant that meets their dietary needs.  In creating the guide, we wanted to provide the “average” IBDer with some practical knowledge of each cuisine, and to give tips on how to navigate a menu and order food when dining and exploring various cuisines.  We hope the guide will become a tool for those with IBD to allow them to make smarter choices.  We also hope to expand it to include additional information (by no means is this guide an exhaustive review of each cuisine!), and in the future we still plan to add more! Feel free to add your own thoughts about the guide, which cuisine you prefer, IBD-friendly restaurants that you recommend, or even certain dishes that you always order because they are “safe” for you.

Download a printable PDF of the entire IBD Guide To Eating Out by clicking here. (more…)

Eggscellent!

When limited to a restrictive diet, one must get creative with the foods that can be tolerated…digestively speaking.  Eggs and most vegetables (cooked of course!) are usually tolerated by the average person with IBD.  But despite the numerous ways of incorporating eggs as a main ingredient, the available dishes are not limitless.  There are only so many times you can eat plain eggs, an omelet or a quiche.  Eggs are extremely versatile, and so we wanted to reincarnate eggs as more than just a breakfast food.  For this blogpost we want to focus on frittatas.  A healthier alternative to a quiche, a frittata omits a pastry crust (high in saturated fats) and milk usually replaces cream.  The frittata filling is also less custard-like, and has more of the consistency of a hardened omelet.

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Wise Organic Chicken

Marnina and I have been eating kosher poultry and beef for our entire lives, and so we profess to have a decent amount of knowledge when it comes to the typical kosher meat offerings.  We have always been led to believe that the quality of kosher meat is superior to non-kosher meat because kosher meat goes through a kashering process, which involves salting the meat to extract the blood.  Also, some people say that the kashering process and the specific diet they are fed, produces moister, more flavorful meat. (more…)

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