Two amateur cooks explore the world of cooking for a Crohn's and Colitis diet

Archive for August, 2012

I Be a fooDie Goes Camping

Before our move to Boston, Marnina and I volunteered at Camp Oasis, a week-long summer camp that enriches the lives of children living with IBD. Established by the Crohn’s & Colitis Foundation of America, the camp provides a supportive community that is beneficial to the campers’s growth and understanding of IBD. The camp is replete with a full physician staff, including doctors, nurses, and other health care professionals. The staff ensures that campers follow their medication, diet, and lifestyle regimens prescribed by their doctors back home. As counselors, Marnina and I provided guidance, safety, mentorship, and sometimes nursing duties. During camp (we attended the Pennsylvania location), we noticed that the campers learn best from each other. They learn that they are not alone; there are other people out there who truly understand their situation. The campers share their IBD stories and build confidence through these friendships.

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Guest Blogpost: IBD Struggle with Food

As you may or may not know, we just moved to Boston.  We are probably one of the few couples you know who set up a kitchen and spice rack before installing a 52″ TV. We know we are weird. That’s why we are foodies, right?

Our new kitchen in Boston!

As we continue to unpack and get settled we would like to share another foodie’s story with you. Meet Louise Hunt – a 24-year-old Crohnie and foodie. These are her thoughts on her struggle with food. (more…)

Turkey: A Culinary Destination

I Be a fooDie takes a cooking class in Istanbul!

As foodies, we enjoy learning about different cuisines.  Our ethnic culinary adventures have ranged from experimenting with a traditional Greek food to popular Korean dishes.  Food was a big part of our travels this past July in Turkey and Israel.  We encountered new ingredients and new flavors, and we gained a new perspective on cooking, as well as a renewed respect for specific ingredients.  In Turkey, ingredients are simple and unadulterated.  There are hardly any incredibly complicated dishes.  The natural state of food is heavily emphasized, and this brought us back to the basics of cooking: using fresh ingredients.  The Turks often love to take seasonal and local ingredients and cook them with some olive oil and a few spices. This method of cooking brings out the flavors in a way that is not complicated or overwhelming, but just perfectly balanced. (more…)

The Well-Traveled Foodies

Dinner in Cappadocia

We recently returned home from our global travels, and in many ways our trip was a gastronomic tour of Turkish and Israeli cuisine.  We tried our best to sample as many mezes, main dishes, desserts, and other foods that we could fit into our stomachs within a 3-week time span.  We were able to stay relatively svelte and fit thanks to walking an average of 8 miles each day.   Our goal during the trip was to try all the authentic cultural foods that these two countries offer, and of course, to stay healthy.  At times, Marnina was forced to expand her diet either because: 1) a Crohn’s-friendly dish was not available; 2) the language barrier caused confusion that led to Marnina biting into a food stuffed with seeds; or 3) she could not resist the temptation of ordering an authentic dish that contained some form of food that might upset her GI tract.  However, thanks to proper plannning (over-the-counter medications, antibiotics, flushable wipes), Marnina was prepared for the worst.  Luckily, neither of us got sick from the food and water in either country.  It turns out that the water is unsafe to drink in Turkey (even for natives) so bottled water was incredibly cheap. (more…)

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