Two amateur cooks explore the world of cooking for a Crohn's and Colitis diet

Archive for the ‘Crohn’s Disease’ Category

The Well-Traveled Foodies

Dinner in Cappadocia

We recently returned home from our global travels, and in many ways our trip was a gastronomic tour of Turkish and Israeli cuisine.  We tried our best to sample as many mezes, main dishes, desserts, and other foods that we could fit into our stomachs within a 3-week time span.  We were able to stay relatively svelte and fit thanks to walking an average of 8 miles each day.   Our goal during the trip was to try all the authentic cultural foods that these two countries offer, and of course, to stay healthy.  At times, Marnina was forced to expand her diet either because: 1) a Crohn’s-friendly dish was not available; 2) the language barrier caused confusion that led to Marnina biting into a food stuffed with seeds; or 3) she could not resist the temptation of ordering an authentic dish that contained some form of food that might upset her GI tract.  However, thanks to proper plannning (over-the-counter medications, antibiotics, flushable wipes), Marnina was prepared for the worst.  Luckily, neither of us got sick from the food and water in either country.  It turns out that the water is unsafe to drink in Turkey (even for natives) so bottled water was incredibly cheap. (more…)

Advertisements

IBD Guide To Eating Out: Part II


We are proud to present Part II of our IBD restaurant guide series!  (To view Part I, click here!)  The average American eats out several times a week, and those with IBD often have a more difficult time choosing IBD-safe foods at restaurants or even finding a restaurant that meets their dietary needs.  In creating the guide, we wanted to provide the “average” IBDer with some practical knowledge of each cuisine, and to give tips on how to navigate a menu and order food when dining and exploring various cuisines.  We hope the guide will become a tool for those with IBD to allow them to make smarter choices.  We also hope to expand it to include additional information (by no means is this guide an exhaustive review of each cuisine!), and in the future we still plan to add more! Feel free to add your own thoughts about the guide, which cuisine you prefer, IBD-friendly restaurants that you recommend, or even certain dishes that you always order because they are “safe” for you.

Download a printable PDF of the entire IBD Guide To Eating Out by clicking here. (more…)

Eggscellent!

When limited to a restrictive diet, one must get creative with the foods that can be tolerated…digestively speaking.  Eggs and most vegetables (cooked of course!) are usually tolerated by the average person with IBD.  But despite the numerous ways of incorporating eggs as a main ingredient, the available dishes are not limitless.  There are only so many times you can eat plain eggs, an omelet or a quiche.  Eggs are extremely versatile, and so we wanted to reincarnate eggs as more than just a breakfast food.  For this blogpost we want to focus on frittatas.  A healthier alternative to a quiche, a frittata omits a pastry crust (high in saturated fats) and milk usually replaces cream.  The frittata filling is also less custard-like, and has more of the consistency of a hardened omelet.

(more…)

Wise Organic Chicken

Marnina and I have been eating kosher poultry and beef for our entire lives, and so we profess to have a decent amount of knowledge when it comes to the typical kosher meat offerings.  We have always been led to believe that the quality of kosher meat is superior to non-kosher meat because kosher meat goes through a kashering process, which involves salting the meat to extract the blood.  Also, some people say that the kashering process and the specific diet they are fed, produces moister, more flavorful meat. (more…)

Non-Dairy Chowder & Purple Sweet Potatoes

Fish Chowda!

On a recent visit to our local supermarket, Marnina and I came to the conclusion that we were spending too much money for subpar produce and seafood.  For months we had been bemoaning the produce and fish section of the supermarket (as well as the entire store in general), but for some reason we could not muster up the courage to switch our allegiance to a new supermarket.  Every now and then we would supplement our shopping trips with some tastier-looking food stores such as Harris Teeter or Whole Foods, but we would do the bulk of our shopping at the less-than-appetizing local grocery store.  We thought we were getting a better deal on our produce and other foods, but in reality, we were paying slightly lower prices for mediocre (and sometimes rotten) food.  (more…)

The Hype Over Probiotics

Probiotics can lead to a happy gut!

There are many therapies that have been touted for Crohn’s Disease and Ulcerative Colitis, but only a few have proven to be truly effective.  The usual medications and lifestyle adjustments are well-known, but somewhere in the midst of all the traditional therapies are the lesser-known complementary therapies, such as probiotics.  The role of bacterial flora has been postulated as a potential contributor to the cause of IBD — it is now generally accepted that the intestinal bacterial flora contributes significantly to the pathogenesis of IBD[1].   The inflammation caused by Crohn’s Disease can also disrupt the natural balance of microorganisms, which can allow harmful organisms to potentially worsen the inflammation.

For those new to probiotics, here is a quick overview: (more…)

Sweet Potato Gnocchi…For Passover!

One of the (many) blessings of Passover is that we see some delicious dishes that are traditionally made only once a year….not from a lack of access to particular ingredients (who doesn’t keep matzah in their pantry year-round??), but because the dietary restrictions of Passover require us to utilize ingredients that we don’t generally use year-round.  For many, this means the holiday is the one time a year we see the Passover dishes that we remember our parents making since we were children.   This year, Marnina made her mom’s peach kugel that was so good that we were scraping the sides of the 9 x 13 baking dish to salvage all of the caked-on pieces.  And for the Seder, my mom made a flanken tzimmes with carrots, sweet potatoes, and prunes – the meat and veggies are slow-cooked with honey and sugar to the point where they are so tender and sweet that they just instantly melt in your mouth (don’t worry, we avoided the prunes at all costs). (more…)

Tag Cloud