Two amateur cooks explore the world of cooking for a Crohn's and Colitis diet

Archive for the ‘Green Onions’ Category

IBD Guide To Eating Out: Part II


We are proud to present Part II of our IBD restaurant guide series!  (To view Part I, click here!)  The average American eats out several times a week, and those with IBD often have a more difficult time choosing IBD-safe foods at restaurants or even finding a restaurant that meets their dietary needs.  In creating the guide, we wanted to provide the “average” IBDer with some practical knowledge of each cuisine, and to give tips on how to navigate a menu and order food when dining and exploring various cuisines.  We hope the guide will become a tool for those with IBD to allow them to make smarter choices.  We also hope to expand it to include additional information (by no means is this guide an exhaustive review of each cuisine!), and in the future we still plan to add more! Feel free to add your own thoughts about the guide, which cuisine you prefer, IBD-friendly restaurants that you recommend, or even certain dishes that you always order because they are “safe” for you.

Download a printable PDF of the entire IBD Guide To Eating Out by clicking here. (more…)

A Venture into Korean Food!

Thanks to our friends Nomie and Noah, we recently delved into the world of Korean cooking.  Before this particular meal, Marnina and I were completely unversed in Korean food; we only knew that Korean and Japan shared some culinary history and that there is some ingredient overlap.  Nomie, who speaks Korean and is very knowledgeable about Korean food and culture, was a capable guide to introduce us to Korean food.  And we are very thankful that she was there, because the instructions on all the package labels were in Korean!  She informed us that traditionally, rice and/or noodles, and vegetables make up many Korean meals, and that commonly used ingredients include sesame oil, soy sauce, salt, garlic, ginger, and pepper.  Meats or tofu are sometimes added to these dishes too.  The basic seasonings make for a relatively salty and spicy meal.  (*Be on the look out for a new restaurant guide in which we will be expanding our list of cuisines and how IBDers can navigate these cuisines*). (more…)

Roasted Parsnip Soup with Mushrooms


Parsnips are an anomaly.  When roasted, they are sweet and slightly spicy.  They are just as versatile as carrots.  And after comparing their nutritional makeup using nutritiondata.com, they are richer in vitamins and minerals than carrots. So why aren’t they as ubiqutous as their close relative, the carrot? We have no idea, and unfortunately, parsnips often languish in produce sections in favor of their more popular and brighter relative.

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Slow-Cooker Meets Turkey

For those with IBD, owning a crockpot (AKA a slow cooker) should be a necessity.  Crockpots can be a time saver — you can set them up to cook while you are at work and then come home to meals without having to slave away in the kitchen. Crockpots are especially useful for making stews, because they cook vegetables, meat and potatoes “to death” while still providing a wholesome and nutritious meal. The slow cooking breaks down the fiber and connective tissues in foods, making them softer and more digestible.  This cooking method also allows the seasoning and sauce to infuse into the cooked veggies, meat, etc.  The final product is always moist (as long as there is enough liquid), and incredibly flavorful.  If you are cooking meat, a crockpot will yield fall-apart meats, which not only sound good, but taste good.  Slow cooking on relatively low heat tenderizes meat, and since Marnina and I often cook with lean meats that are inherently less tender (less fat = less tenderness), we often use the crockpot to tenderize our ground turkey or ground beef. (more…)

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