Two amateur cooks explore the world of cooking for a Crohn's and Colitis diet

Posts tagged ‘mushrooms’

In with the Fresh Herbs!

Fresh herbs can make or break a dish. In the past, we have often used dried herbs as a substitute for fresh herbs. We turned to the fresh variety when we felt it would truly enhance the taste, but we often substituted dried herbs because of the convenience factor, and because we could never use up the entire bunch of fresh herbs before it went bad. But now, after consistently cooking with fresh herbs for a few weeks, we may never turn back.  Needless to say we thoroughly enjoy the fact that our refrigerator is constantly stocked with an assortment of fresh herbs, whether it be dill, parsley, cilantro, or thyme.

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Turkey: A Culinary Destination

I Be a fooDie takes a cooking class in Istanbul!

As foodies, we enjoy learning about different cuisines.  Our ethnic culinary adventures have ranged from experimenting with a traditional Greek food to popular Korean dishes.  Food was a big part of our travels this past July in Turkey and Israel.  We encountered new ingredients and new flavors, and we gained a new perspective on cooking, as well as a renewed respect for specific ingredients.  In Turkey, ingredients are simple and unadulterated.  There are hardly any incredibly complicated dishes.  The natural state of food is heavily emphasized, and this brought us back to the basics of cooking: using fresh ingredients.  The Turks often love to take seasonal and local ingredients and cook them with some olive oil and a few spices. This method of cooking brings out the flavors in a way that is not complicated or overwhelming, but just perfectly balanced. (more…)

Gold’n Plump Chicken!

At I Be a fooDie, our goal is to deliver healthy food choices and sound nutritional advice for those who suffer from IBD.  We often espouse the benefits of a certain food or a certain cooking technique, and we hope that our readers pick up on our tips.  One food that we have not given enough attention is chicken.  For many IBDers, chicken is a safe food when compared to other protein sources, such as red meat, nuts, and beans.  The leanest part of the chicken is the chicken breast, and when eaten without the skin, the chicken has a much lower fat (and saturated fat) content than red meat (a lower fat content means less gastrointestinal distress and less digestive work for your intestines).  It is also super versatile, and so it can be modified to fit almost anyone’s taste preferences. (more…)

Roasted Parsnip Soup with Mushrooms


Parsnips are an anomaly.  When roasted, they are sweet and slightly spicy.  They are just as versatile as carrots.  And after comparing their nutritional makeup using nutritiondata.com, they are richer in vitamins and minerals than carrots. So why aren’t they as ubiqutous as their close relative, the carrot? We have no idea, and unfortunately, parsnips often languish in produce sections in favor of their more popular and brighter relative.

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Carrot-Mushroom Loaf

Marnina and I are obsessed with the Moosewood Cookbook.  It is a recipe book written by Mollie Katzen when she was a member of the Moosewood collective in Ithaca, New York.  The cookbook is literally a bible for vegetarian cooks.  Even though we are not vegetarians, our animal consumption is limited to Friday night Shabbat dinners and special occasions (mostly because of the high prices of Kosher meat).  Every single recipe from this cookbook that we have tried has been superb as are the creative names and illustrations attached to each recipe.  We once made a dish from the cookbook called Zucchanoes, which are onion, pepper, and cheese stuffed zucchinis that look nothing like canoes by the time they are out of the oven, but they do float you to food heaven.

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